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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

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image: FDA OKs Herpesvirus to Treat Cancer

FDA OKs Herpesvirus to Treat Cancer

By | October 28, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of an engineered herpesvirus for the treatment of melanoma marks the first oncolytic virus to enter the market.

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image: WHO: Some Meats May Cause Cancer

WHO: Some Meats May Cause Cancer

By | October 27, 2015

Experts discuss the agency’s classification of red and processed meats as probable and confirmed carcinogens, respectively.

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image: Antioxidants May Aid Cancer

Antioxidants May Aid Cancer

By | October 16, 2015

Mice given a dietary supplement had faster-progressing melanoma, a study shows.

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image: Explaining Elephants’ Cancer Resistance

Explaining Elephants’ Cancer Resistance

By | October 13, 2015

Two studies reveal that the giant mammals have dozens of extra copies of a cancer-preventing gene.

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image: Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

By | October 12, 2015

Despite known problems with contamination and mislabeled cell lines, most researchers continue to operate without authenticating cells’ identity.

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Cultural Riches

Cultural Riches

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers devise new techniques to facilitate growing bacteria collected from the environment.

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