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image: Organoid Biobank

Organoid Biobank

By | May 11, 2015

From the tissue of numerous colon cancer patients, researchers build 3-D cultures of tumors.

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image: Prokaryotic Microbes with Eukaryote-like Genes Found

Prokaryotic Microbes with Eukaryote-like Genes Found

By | May 6, 2015

Deep-sea microbes possess hallmarks of eukaryotic cells, hinting at a common ancestor for archaea and eukaryotes.

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image: Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

By | May 4, 2015

Cytoskeleton specialist Alan Hall was best known for unpacking the roles of Rho GTPases.   

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image: Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

By | May 1, 2015

Whole-body immunoPET scans of SIV-infected macaques reveal where the replicating virus hides.  

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image: Show Me Your Moves

Show Me Your Moves

By | May 1, 2015

Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.

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image: The Origins of O

The Origins of O

By | May 1, 2015

A strain of HIV that has afflicted more than 100,000 people emerged from gorillas.

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image: Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

By | April 28, 2015

Reengineered protein-shuttling machinery can be used to inject a particular protein into mammalian cells, according to a proof-of-principle study.

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image: <em>The Scientist</em> on the Pulse, April 23

The Scientist on the Pulse, April 23

By | April 23, 2015

Hot topics in cancer research from the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

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image: The Lasting Effects of Obesity

The Lasting Effects of Obesity

By | April 23, 2015

Losing weight does not mitigate the effects of obesity on tumor development in mice.

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image: Personalized Devices Predict Cancer Drug Response

Personalized Devices Predict Cancer Drug Response

By | April 22, 2015

Two teams have developed tumor-implantable drug delivery devices to study real-time responses to multiple therapies in cancer patients.

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