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image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.


image: Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

Next Generation: Seeing Brain Tumors

By | February 27, 2014

A new camera system supports the visualization of gliomas stained with Tumor Paint, a chlorotoxin-based imaging agent that’s currently in clinical trials.


image: A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

A Wine Bacterium’s Proteome

By | February 26, 2014

Scientists map the partial proteome of a common lactic acid bacterium.


image: Paper-Based Cancer Test?

Paper-Based Cancer Test?

By | February 25, 2014

Nanoscale agents that detect disease-associated synthetic biomarkers in urine could one day streamline the diagnosis of tumors, heart disease, and more.

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image: How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

How a Microbe Resists Its Own Antibiotics

By | February 20, 2014

Researchers reveal the molecular mechanisms of Streptomyces platensis’s defense from its own antibiotics, which inhibit fatty acid synthesis in other microbes.


image: Microbial Smog

Microbial Smog

By | February 3, 2014

Some 1,300 species of microbes, including some associated with allergies and lung disease, are adrift in Beijing’s thick smog.


image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.


image: Tenacious Termites

Tenacious Termites

By | February 1, 2014

Formosan subterranean termites evade deadly pathogens by building nests lined with their own feces.


image: The Necrobiome

The Necrobiome

By | February 1, 2014

Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial assemblages that inhabit a corpse throughout decomposition improve time-of-death estimates.


image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts


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