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» cancer and microbiology

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: Organelle Architecture

Organelle Architecture

By | December 1, 2013

There’s beauty in a cell’s marriage of structure and function.

1 Comment

image: Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

Out, Damned Mycoplasma!

By | December 1, 2013

Pointers for keeping your cell cultures free of mycoplasma contamination

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image: Patchy Plankton

Patchy Plankton

By | December 1, 2013

Turbulence interacts with the stabilizing efforts of motile phytoplankton to create small-scale patches of toxic, bloom-forming organisms.

1 Comment

image: Tracking Fecal Transplants

Tracking Fecal Transplants

By | November 26, 2013

A long-term study confirms transplants of stool microbes from healthy donors can successfully clear recurrent Clostridium difficile infections.

2 Comments

image: Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

Next Generation: Bactericidal Surface

By | November 26, 2013

A synthetic material covered in nano-spikes resembling those found on insect wings is an effective killer of diverse microbes.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

2 Comments

image: Temperature-Dependent Immunity

Temperature-Dependent Immunity

By | November 18, 2013

Scientists show that mice housed at room temperature are less able to fight tumors.

8 Comments

image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.

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