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image: Mapping the Human Connectome

Mapping the Human Connectome

By | July 20, 2016

A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

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image: Arming Synthetic Bacteria Against Cancer

Arming Synthetic Bacteria Against Cancer

By | July 20, 2016

Researchers engineer bacteria that deliver an anti-tumor toxin in mice before self-destructing. 

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image: Distinguishing Circulating Tumor from Normal Cell-Free DNA

Distinguishing Circulating Tumor from Normal Cell-Free DNA

By | July 19, 2016

Fragments of circulating DNA from tumors are around 20 to 30 base pairs shorter than those from healthy cells, researchers report.

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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image: Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

By | July 13, 2016

The first data include real-time neural activity in the visual cortex of mice observing pictures and videos.

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Juno Therapeutics asks the US Food and Drug Administration for permission to restart the CAR-T experiments without chemotherapy.

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image: CRISPR Combats Herpes

CRISPR Combats Herpes

By | July 5, 2016

Scientists use the gene editing technology to target active and latent virus in mammalian cell cultures.

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image: Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

Immune Cells' Role in Tissue Maintenance and Repair

By , and | July 1, 2016

The cells of the mammalian immune system do more than just fight off pathogens; they are also important players in stem cell function and are thus crucial for maintaining homeostasis and recovering from injury.

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Human cancer cells constrained to capillary-like microtubes divide unevenly, scientists show.

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image: Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity

By | June 23, 2016

Using a new approach to analyze the transcriptomes of thousands of individual cell nuclei in postmortem brains, researchers identify multiple neuronal subtypes.

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