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image: Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

By | December 17, 2013

Water samples collected from natural gas extraction sites in Colorado contain hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to birth defects, infertility, and cancer.

1 Comment

image: Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

By | December 17, 2013

A microtubule-severing enzyme curbs the regeneration of damaged nerve cells.

1 Comment

image: Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

By | December 16, 2013

Mouse colon cancer cells can fuse with macrophages, leading to changes in tumor growth.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

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image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

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image: Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

Male and Female Brains Wired Differently

By | December 4, 2013

The brains of men contain stronger front-to-rear connections while those of women are better connected from left to right.

7 Comments

image: Opinion: Of Mice and Men

Opinion: Of Mice and Men

By | December 3, 2013

Researchers scramble to put mouse cancer models on solid footing.

1 Comment

image: Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

By | December 1, 2013

Mouse mothers can improve their pups’ memories by altering levels of immune chemicals in their milk.

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image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

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image: Herring Impaired

Herring Impaired

By | December 1, 2013

Changing ion channel densities allows fish to tune their hearing to male reproductive calls during breeding periods. 

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