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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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image: Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

By | December 20, 2016

Studying savant-like behaviors in birds could help researchers better understand autism spectrum disorders.

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image: Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

By | December 20, 2016

Reductions in the volume of gray matter in specific regions appear to represent synaptic pruning, a new study suggests, that tunes a mother’s brain to childcare.

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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image: MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Losses Grow

MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Losses Grow

By | December 13, 2016

The first two months of the fiscal year saw $102.4 million in operating losses.

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In a pair of clinical studies of psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, participants reported positive changes to their moods and outlooks.

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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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