The Scientist

» cancer, neuroscience and evolution

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

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Heady Stuff

By | November 1, 2015

New research on how fat influences brain neuronal activity

1 Comment

image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

2 Comments

image: Evolution of the Penis

Evolution of the Penis

By | October 30, 2015

A phallus-less reptile goes through a developmental stage with external genitalia, suggesting a common origin for the organ among amniotes.

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image: FDA OKs Herpesvirus to Treat Cancer

FDA OKs Herpesvirus to Treat Cancer

By | October 28, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of an engineered herpesvirus for the treatment of melanoma marks the first oncolytic virus to enter the market.

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image: WHO: Some Meats May Cause Cancer

WHO: Some Meats May Cause Cancer

By | October 27, 2015

Experts discuss the agency’s classification of red and processed meats as probable and confirmed carcinogens, respectively.

4 Comments

image: Rewarding Companions

Rewarding Companions

By | October 26, 2015

Oxytocin and social contact together modulate endocannabinoid activity in the mouse brain, which could help explain the prosocial effects of marijuana use. 

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image: Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

Electrode-Free Electrophysiology

By | October 22, 2015

Optogenetics has evolved beyond its neuron-stimulating capacities to an all-optical approach for both manipulating and recording cells.

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