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image: Malaria Drug Resistance Spreading

Malaria Drug Resistance Spreading

By | April 9, 2012

A genomic analysis reveals a crucial detail in drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite that are on the move in Southeast Asia.

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image: Tall Women Beware

Tall Women Beware

By | April 5, 2012

Extra inches may mean a higher chance of getting ovarian cancer.

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News from Cancer Meeting

By | April 4, 2012

A roundup of recent research announced this week at the annual conference of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

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image: Lab Studies Lie about the Clock

Lab Studies Lie about the Clock

By | April 4, 2012

Fly circadian behavior is dramatically different in natural environments than in the lab.

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image: Organizational Regulation

Organizational Regulation

By | April 4, 2012

A new study shows that transcription of genes in trypanosome parasites is regulated by genome organization.

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image: How Predictive are Genomes?

How Predictive are Genomes?

By | April 3, 2012

Researchers put the predictive power of whole genome sequencing to the test.

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image: A Brighter Beacon

A Brighter Beacon

By | April 1, 2012

A novel liquid laser set-up can detect single nucleotide mutations in a cancer gene.

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image: A Malignant Alliance

A Malignant Alliance

By | April 1, 2012

Two proteins interact to save adhesion molecules from degradation, potentially contributing to a more aggressive cancer.

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image: Agents Provocateurs

Agents Provocateurs

By | April 1, 2012

Asking pointed questions is a key part of the scientific process.

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Contributors

April 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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