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By implanting patient- or rodent-derived mini-guts into mice, scientists can rapidly create more-accurate murine models of the disease

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image: Developing Brains in Dishes

Developing Brains in Dishes

By | April 26, 2017

Two studies report methods to mimic human fetal brain development using neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells that form 3-D, brain-like structures. 

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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image: Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

By | April 14, 2017

Ben Henry explores the science behind a deep-fried cancer scare and traditional treatments that may shrink tumors.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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By converting glial cells into dopaminergic neurons, scientists were able to partially rescue motor behavior in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

By | April 7, 2017

After an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By | April 5, 2017

Notable quotes from this year’s annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

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image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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