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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

Using Raman Spectroscopy to Identify Cell Types

By | December 1, 2016

Improvements in instruments and statistical tools allow the capture and analysis of large data sets.

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A noninvasive microscopy technique that exploits NADH fluorescence enables researchers to observe how mitochondria alter their shape and arrangement in human tissue.

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image: Speaking of Neuroscience

Speaking of Neuroscience

By and | November 18, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting

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image: Hot Topics at SfN

Hot Topics at SfN

By | November 18, 2016

Researchers at this year’s Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego, California, discuss what they found most interesting.

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image: Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

By | November 17, 2016

The brain’s structural connections are unique to an individual, a new imaging technique reveals.

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image: Neuroscience in a Nutshell

Neuroscience in a Nutshell

By | November 16, 2016

Sessions at the ongoing Society for Neuroscience meeting have covered topics from brain development to emotional processing.

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image: Categorizing Brain Cells

Categorizing Brain Cells

By | November 16, 2016

Researchers at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego discuss new efforts to perform single-cell analyses on the brain’s billions of cells.

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image: First CRISPR Clinical Trial Commences

First CRISPR Clinical Trial Commences

By | November 15, 2016

Scientists in China aim to treat 10 people with lung cancer with CRISPR-edited cells.

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image: Probing Exercise’s Effects on Cognitive Function

Probing Exercise’s Effects on Cognitive Function

By | November 14, 2016

Researchers at the Society for Neuroscience discuss what we know—and don’t—about how physical activity affects the brain.

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