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image: How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

By | November 19, 2015

A type of bariatric surgery eliminates gut-to-brain signals that trigger sugar highs, a mouse study shows.  

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image: Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

By | November 19, 2015

A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.

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image: Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier

Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | November 11, 2015

Researchers deliver cancer-fighting drugs to a patient’s brain via the bloodstream, penetrating the blood-brain barrier for the first time.

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image: Oncologist Found Guilty of Misconduct

Oncologist Found Guilty of Misconduct

By | November 9, 2015

A government investigation concludes that Anil Potti faked data on multiple grants and papers.

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image: Gene Editing Treats Leukemia

Gene Editing Treats Leukemia

By | November 6, 2015

One-year-old Layla Richards has remained cancer-free months after receiving an experimental gene editing therapy.

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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

By | November 1, 2015

How the foods that make us fattest are not that different from heroin and cocaine

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

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