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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

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image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

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image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

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image: Viruses Prefer the Cold

Viruses Prefer the Cold

By | May 20, 2013

Chilly weather could impede the immune reactions that most effectively contain viruses like the common cold.  

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image: Protective Phages

Protective Phages

By | May 20, 2013

Viruses that attack bacteria may be an important component of our gut microbiota.

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image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

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image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes

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image: Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

By | May 3, 2013

The brain’s role in aging; tracking disease; understanding the new flu virus; no autism-Lyme link; one drug’s journey from bench to bedside

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image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.

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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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