The Scientist

» cancer, immunology and developmental biology

Most Recent

Human cancer cells constrained to capillary-like microtubes divide unevenly, scientists show.

0 Comments

image: Transmissible Cancers Plague Mollusks

Transmissible Cancers Plague Mollusks

By | June 22, 2016

Researchers identify three new examples of infectious cancers affecting these invertebrates.

0 Comments

image: Sex Differences in Immune Response

Sex Differences in Immune Response

By | June 21, 2016

Female mice lacking an immune receptor are better than males at fighting certain viral infections.

0 Comments

image: Treating Cancer with CRISPR?

Treating Cancer with CRISPR?

By | June 17, 2016

A federal panel will review the first proposal for the use of the technology to edit human genes for medical purposes.

1 Comment

image: TS Picks: June 6, 2016

TS Picks: June 6, 2016

By | June 6, 2016

American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting edition 

0 Comments

image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2016 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Enhancing Vaccine Development

Enhancing Vaccine Development

By | June 1, 2016

Using proteomics methods to inform antigen selection

1 Comment

image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

1 Comment

image: Screening  with CRISPR

Screening with CRISPR

By | June 1, 2016

Ever-improving CRISPR-based tools are already ripe for large-scale genetic screens.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham