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image: Image of the Day: Triple Threat

Image of the Day: Triple Threat

By | September 18, 2017

Scientists use stem-like cells from patients’ aggressive, triple receptor-negative breast tumors to grow cell lines for research.

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image: Image of the Day: Fish Avatars for Cancer

Image of the Day: Fish Avatars for Cancer

By | September 11, 2017

Zebrafish larvae transplanted with patients’ tumors respond as their human donors do to chemotherapy.

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image: Study: Alcohol Industry Distorts Cancer Risk

Study: Alcohol Industry Distorts Cancer Risk

By | September 10, 2017

Researchers claim that industry groups worldwide misrepresent the carcinogenicity of alcohol products.

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image: How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

By | September 8, 2017

Epinephrine’s activation of the signaling pathway Hippo is responsible for the in vitro tumor-fighting effects of serum from women who worked out.

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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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Douglas Lowy and John Schiller, whose work led to the HPV vaccine, and Michael Hall, who discovered the TOR pathway, win this year’s prizes.

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image: An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

By | September 1, 2017

A new study uses blood samples from pregnant women to track changes in the immune system leading up to birth, and predicts gestational age from the mothers’ immune signatures.

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image: Bubbles for Broken Bones

Bubbles for Broken Bones

By | September 1, 2017

Ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles enable gene delivery to fix fractures.

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image: Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

By | September 1, 2017

Most didn’t believe French doctor Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran when he said he’d spotted the causative agent of the disease—and that it was an animal.

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image: Far-Out Science

Far-Out Science

By | September 1, 2017

How psychedelic drugs and infectious microbes alter brain function

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