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image: Dating the Origin of Us

Dating the Origin of Us

By | November 1, 2013

Theoretical anthropogeny seeks to understand how Homo sapiens rose to a position of global dominance.

11 Comments

image: How, If, and Why Species Form

How, If, and Why Species Form

By , , and | November 1, 2013

Biologists have struggled for centuries to properly define what constitutes a “species.” They may have been asking the wrong question—many smaller organisms might not form species at all.

10 Comments

image: The Ultimate Wingman

The Ultimate Wingman

By | November 1, 2013

Differential gene expression between dominant and subordinate male turkeys could help evolutionary biologists deconstruct the roots of sexual dimorphism.

1 Comment

image: Gravity Determines Cell Size

Gravity Determines Cell Size

By | October 29, 2013

Researchers show that cells may have evolved to be small because of gravitational forces.

1 Comment

image: Evolving Pain Resistance

Evolving Pain Resistance

By | October 24, 2013

Grasshopper mice harbor mutations in a pain-transmitting sodium channel that allow them to prey on highly toxic bark scorpions.

2 Comments

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Ancient Bee Die Out

Ancient Bee Die Out

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers show that one group of bees likely suffered a mass extinction about 65 million years ago.

1 Comment

image: Confirmed Venomous Crustacean

Confirmed Venomous Crustacean

By | October 22, 2013

Researchers show that a cave-dwelling crustacean may use venom to immobilize and digest its prey.

1 Comment

image: Clocking Epigenetics

Clocking Epigenetics

By | October 22, 2013

DNA methylation status can predict age in various human tissues, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: A Dire Air Pollution Warning

A Dire Air Pollution Warning

By | October 21, 2013

Contaminants in the air are officially carcinogens, according to the World Health Organization.

2 Comments

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