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The Scientist

» cancer, immunology and evolution

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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Author Nets Seven Retractions

Author Nets Seven Retractions

By | February 22, 2016

Biochemical Pharmacology pulls papers coauthored by a scientist whose work has been under investigation at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Turning Tumor Cells Against Cancer

Turning Tumor Cells Against Cancer

By | February 8, 2016

In mice, cancer cells genetically modified to express an anticancer cytokine home to tumors and can reduce their growth. 

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image: Cancer Detected in Naked Mole Rats

Cancer Detected in Naked Mole Rats

By | February 8, 2016

Two captive males of the cancer-resistant species have shown signs of malignant tumors.

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image: Chat With Charlie

Chat With Charlie

By | February 1, 2016

See a preview of the app that lets you ask questions of a virtual Charles Darwin.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fighting Back

Fighting Back

By | February 1, 2016

Plants can’t run away from attackers, so they’ve evolved unique immune defenses to protect themselves.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: iDarwin

iDarwin

By | February 1, 2016

A synthetic interview with the father of evolutionary theory, now available as a smartphone app, teaches students and the public about the famed biologist.

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