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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: A Studious Survivor

A Studious Survivor

By | April 1, 2016

Meet Lauren Bendesky, the teen who beat neuroblastoma and is now on her way to becoming a pediatric oncologist who treats and studies other kids with cancer.

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image: A Tree  Takes Root

A Tree Takes Root

By | April 1, 2016

Four apparently unrelated individuals share a common ancestor from whom they inherited a rare mutation that predisposed them to the cancer they share.

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image: Banking on Blood Tests

Banking on Blood Tests

By | April 1, 2016

How close are liquid biopsies to replacing current diagnostics?

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Cancer's Vanguard

Cancer's Vanguard

By | April 1, 2016

Exosomes are emerging as key players in metastasis.

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image: Cancerous Conduits

Cancerous Conduits

By | April 1, 2016

Metastatic cancer cells use nanotubes to manipulate blood vessels.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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