The Scientist

» cancer and immunology

Most Recent

image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

2 Comments

image: Roche Snags Tumor Tester for $1B

Roche Snags Tumor Tester for $1B

By | January 13, 2015

The pharmaceutical company bought a majority stake in Foundation Medicine, a firm that develops personalized cancer-medicine diagnostics.

0 Comments

image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk—more so than heritable mutations and environmental factors combined.  

7 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: The Year in Pathogens

The Year in Pathogens

By | December 29, 2014

Ebola, MERS, and enterovirus D68; polio eradication efforts; new regulations on potentially dangerous research

0 Comments

image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.

0 Comments

image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

0 Comments

image: “Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

“Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

By | December 17, 2014

Australian researcher Donald Metcalf, whose discoveries transformed cancer treatment, has passed away at age 85.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Humans Never Stopped Evolving
    Features Humans Never Stopped Evolving

    The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

  2. An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock
  3. Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney
  4. Abundant Sequence Errors in Public Databases
Business Birmingham