The Scientist

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image: Bubble Vision

Bubble Vision

By | May 1, 2012

Turning a liability into an asset, cryo-electron microscopists exploit an artifact to probe protein structure.

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image: Freezing Time

Freezing Time

By | May 1, 2012

Targeting the briefest moment in chemistry may lead to an exceptionally strong new class of drugs.

15 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2012

May 2012's selection of notable quotes

8 Comments

image: SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

SPRead Your Antibody Capabilities

By | May 1, 2012

Using surface plasmon resonance to improve antibody detection and characterization: four case studies

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image: Telomeres in Disease

Telomeres in Disease

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres have been linked to numerous diseases over the years, but how exactly short telomeres cause diseases and how medicine can prevent telomere erosion are still up for debate.

16 Comments

image: The Best of Experimental Biology

The Best of Experimental Biology

By | April 25, 2012

From breast milk stem cells to bone repair, this year’s EB conference held a number of exciting advances that could one day be translated into therapies.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

Opinion: Data to Knowledge to Action

By | April 18, 2012

Introducing DELSA Global, a community initiative to connect experts, share data, and democratize science.

2 Comments

image: Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

Scottish DNA Unexpectedly Diverse

By | April 18, 2012

Geography might explain the treasure trove of genetic diversity among Scots.

2 Comments

image: Huntington's Disease Protects from Cancer?

Huntington's Disease Protects from Cancer?

By | April 13, 2012

Swedish researchers have discovered that patients with the neurodegenerative disorder had half the normal expected risk of developing tumors.

6 Comments

image: Monkeys “Read” Writing

Monkeys “Read” Writing

By | April 12, 2012

Baboons are able to distinguish printed English words from nonsense sequences of letters—the first step in the reading process.

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