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image: The Scientist’s 2012 Geeky Gift Guide

The Scientist’s 2012 Geeky Gift Guide

By | December 6, 2012

Find the perfect present for the dedicated (or budding) scientists in your life

1 Comment

image: Hand Signs for Science

Hand Signs for Science

By | December 5, 2012

Organizations are calling for a common set of sign language for scientific terms.

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image: Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

Book Excerpt from Tibet Wild

By | December 1, 2012

In the introduction to his latest book, renowned naturalist George Schaller describes the evolving role of the field biologist through the lens of his experiences with Himalayan wildlife.

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image: Playing the Field

Playing the Field

By | December 1, 2012

The role of field biologists is changing as conservation biology evolves and ecological challenges mount.

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image: Waking Cancer Cells

Waking Cancer Cells

By | December 1, 2012

A protein called Coco rouses dormant breast cancer cells in the lung.

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image: A Blood Test for Cancer?

A Blood Test for Cancer?

By | November 30, 2012

Researchers are getting closer to detecting abnormal tumor DNA circulating in the bloodstream.

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image: Art Through the Nose

Art Through the Nose

By | November 29, 2012

A new show at New York’s Museum of Art and Design celebrates olfaction and the science behind modern perfume making.

3 Comments

image: Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

Architecture Reveals Genome’s Secrets

By | November 25, 2012

Three-dimensional genome maps are leading to a deeper understanding of how the genome’s form influences its function.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

1 Comment

image: How Mole Rats Fight Cancer

How Mole Rats Fight Cancer

By | November 6, 2012

Blind mole rats resist cancer by killing cells that proliferate in a similar way to tumor cells.

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