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Deliberating Over Danger

By | April 1, 2012

The creation of H5N1 bird flu strains that are transmissible between mammals has thrown the scientific community into a heated debate about whether such research should be allowed and how it should be regulated.

16 Comments

image: Eyes on Cancer

Eyes on Cancer

By | April 1, 2012

Techniques for watching tumors do their thing

4 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2012

April 2012's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

The World in a Cabinet, 1600s

By | April 1, 2012

A 17th century Danish doctor arranges a museum of natural history oddities in his own home.

2 Comments

image: Failed Drugs Expose Preclinical Blunders

Failed Drugs Expose Preclinical Blunders

By | March 30, 2012

Once a promising cancer treatment, the failure of PARP inhibitors in the clinic may be due to flawed preclinical studies.

2 Comments

image: So You Think About Dance?

So You Think About Dance?

By | March 30, 2012

Spectators experience some of the same brain impulses as the dancers they're watching.

2 Comments

image: Collecting Cancer Data

Collecting Cancer Data

By | March 29, 2012

Two new cancer cell line databases bursting with genomic and drug profiling data may help researchers identify drug targets.

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image: Courts Re-Examining Gene Patents

Courts Re-Examining Gene Patents

By | March 28, 2012

The US Supreme Court ordered patents held by Myriad Genetics to be reviewed further by the Federal Circuit Court.

2 Comments

image: More Oversight for Omics Tests

More Oversight for Omics Tests

By | March 27, 2012

A new report outlines ways in which omics-based technologies can be shuttled more safely and effectively from the bench to the clinic.

0 Comments

image: James Cameron Hits Rock Bottom

James Cameron Hits Rock Bottom

By | March 27, 2012

The movie director-turned-explorer made the 6.8-mile drop to the deepest point on the seafloor, but wasn’t too impressed by what he found.

4 Comments

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