The Scientist

» cancer, culture and ecology

Most Recent

image: Week in Review: August 29–September 2

Week in Review: August 29–September 2

By | September 2, 2016

Roger Tsien dies; the CRISPR patent dispute you’ve never heard of; immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s; Tasmanian devils developing resistance to transmissible cancer

0 Comments

image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

1 Comment

image: A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

A Tribe of Hornbill Hunters Turns to Conservation

By | September 1, 2016

An indigenous community in northeastern India is a crucial part of the effort to save these majestic forest birds from extinction.

1 Comment

In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

1 Comment

image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

0 Comments

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

1 Comment

image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.

0 Comments

The marsupials’ genomes show evidence of a rapid evolutionary response to selection imposed by devil facial tumor disease.

2 Comments

image: Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

Stem Cells Drive Cancer Risk in Mice

By | August 26, 2016

Mutations that arise during stem cell division contribute to the development of cancers in a variety of organs, according to a study.

0 Comments

image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. An Aging-Related Effect on the Circadian Clock
  2. Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney
  3. ADHD Linked to Structural Differences in the Brain
  4. Opinion: Is a Clone Really Born at Age Zero?
Business Birmingham