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image: Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

By | May 1, 2017

A new approach to immunotherapy finds that the immune-cell clonotypes that come to the rescue start out at very low frequencies.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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By implanting patient- or rodent-derived mini-guts into mice, scientists can rapidly create more-accurate murine models of the disease

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image: Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

By | April 14, 2017

Ben Henry explores the science behind a deep-fried cancer scare and traditional treatments that may shrink tumors.

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By | April 5, 2017

Notable quotes from this year’s annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

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image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Fat’s Influence on Cancer

Fat’s Influence on Cancer

By | April 3, 2017

Researchers at the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting discuss the roles of adipose tissue and inflammation in the growth and spread of tumors.

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image: Cancer Genomes

Cancer Genomes

By | April 1, 2017

April Scientist to Watch Angela Brooks of the University of California, Santa Cruz, discusses her search to find vulnerabilities buried within the genomes of cancer cells.

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In the middle of the 20th century, the National Cancer Institute began testing plant extracts for chemotherapeutic potential—helping to discover some drugs still in use today.

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