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image: Telomere Basics

Telomere Basics

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 

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In Chapter 12, "The Opium Fields," author Marc Lewis recounts one night spent in the brain chemistry-bending grip of opium addiction.

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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2012

Masters of the Planet, Learning from the Octopus, Darwin’s Devices, and Psychology’s Ghosts

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Contributors

May 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

By | May 1, 2012

A transition-state mimic has the power to bind an enzyme at its tipping point as strongly as any available inhibitor and more strongly than most, preventing enzymatic activity. 

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image: Dopamine: Duality of Desire

Dopamine: Duality of Desire

By | May 1, 2012

Being an ex-drug-addict turned neuroscientist brings a unique insight into the physiological and phenomenological realities of addiction.

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image: Tumor Turnabout

Tumor Turnabout

By | May 1, 2012

A cytokine involved in suppressing the immune system may actually activate it to kill cancer cells.

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image: Freezing Time

Freezing Time

By | May 1, 2012

Targeting the briefest moment in chemistry may lead to an exceptionally strong new class of drugs.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2012

May 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: Telomeres in Disease

Telomeres in Disease

By | May 1, 2012

Telomeres have been linked to numerous diseases over the years, but how exactly short telomeres cause diseases and how medicine can prevent telomere erosion are still up for debate.

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