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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Politics of Cancer</em>

Book Excerpt from The Politics of Cancer

By | April 1, 2017

In Chapter 2, “Identifying the Culprits,” author Wendy Whitman Cobb describes how small-government, anti-regulation conservatism can hinder the fight against cancer.

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image: Cancer and Its Milieu

Cancer and Its Milieu

By | April 1, 2017

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researcher and April profilee Mina Bissell explains the intricacies of how cancer takes hold in a body.

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image: Cooking Up Cancer?

Cooking Up Cancer?

By | April 1, 2017

Overcooked potatoes and burnt toast contain acrylamide, a potential carcinogen that researchers have struggled to reliably link to human cancers.

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Mice engineered to overproduce the organelles involved in cell division spontaneously develop malignancies.

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image: How Will Cancer Research Fare Under Trump?

How Will Cancer Research Fare Under Trump?

By | April 1, 2017

The new administration has not yet made its intentions clear.

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image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | April 1, 2017

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

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Measuring PD-L1 levels was a great start. Now we need to quantify more protein biomarkers, assess the tumor mutational landscape, and examine immune cell signatures, too.

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image: How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

How Cancers Evolve Drug Resistance

By | April 1, 2017

Researchers unravel the sophisticated ways cancers evade treatments, including immunotherapies, designed to destroy them.

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image: Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

Neoantigens Enable Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

By | April 1, 2017

Tumors’ mutations can encode the seeds of their own destruction, in the form of immunogenic peptides recognized by T cells.

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