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Scientists generate tumor-targeting molecules that can be used for imaging and treatment.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 11, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Beneficial Brew

Beneficial Brew

By | June 1, 2014

Drinking green tea appears to boost the activity of DNA repair enzymes.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2014 issue of The Scientist

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image: Tactical Maneuvers

Tactical Maneuvers

By | June 1, 2014

Scientists are creating viruses that naturally home in on tumor cells while simultaneously boosting the body’s immune system to fight cancer.

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image: Targeting Tumors with Viruses

Targeting Tumors with Viruses

By | June 1, 2014

Stephanie Swift discusses the strategy of fighting cancer with viruses.

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image: Week in Review: May 26–30

Week in Review: May 26–30

By | May 30, 2014

Human proteome cataloged; island-separated crickets evolved silence; molecule shows promise for combatting coronaviruses; study replication etiquette; another call for STAP retraction

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image: Spotlight on the Cytoskeleton

Spotlight on the Cytoskeleton

By | May 27, 2014

Technique allows researchers to see the inner workings of cellular scaffolding molecules actin and tubulin.

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image: Week in Review: May 19–23

Week in Review: May 19–23

By | May 23, 2014

Sperm-sex–sensing sows; blocking a pain receptor extends lifespan in mice; stop codons can code for amino acids; exploring the tumor exome

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image: Making Sense of the Tumor Exome

Making Sense of the Tumor Exome

By | May 18, 2014

An algorithm can pick out biologically and clinically meaningful variants from whole-exome sequences of tumors.

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