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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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image: Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

By | January 20, 2017

Researchers find diverse ways that the molecules can regulate cancer’s spread.

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A cell phone–based microscope can identify mutations in tumor tissue and image products of DNA sequencing reactions.

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A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

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image: As the Brain Ages, Glial-Cell Gene Expression Changes Most

As the Brain Ages, Glial-Cell Gene Expression Changes Most

By | January 10, 2017

Researchers describe how gene expression in different human brain regions is altered with age.

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image: Neural Mechanism Links Alcohol Consumption to Binge Eating

Neural Mechanism Links Alcohol Consumption to Binge Eating

By | January 10, 2017

Ethanol triggers starvation-activated neurons, leading mice to overeat. 

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image: Image of the Day: Feeding Time

Image of the Day: Feeding Time

By | January 10, 2017

Scientists are working to improve the abilities of therapeutic antibodies to flag cancer cells (orange) for destruction by macrophages (blue).  

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The tumor biologist’s landmark discovery provided the first clear evidence that genetic mutations could lead to cancer, and gave rise to a crucial cancer drug.

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