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image: Benefits of Missing MYC

Benefits of Missing MYC

By | January 22, 2015

Mice engineered to have just one copy of the gene Myc live longer, healthier lives than wild-type animals.

1 Comment

image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.

4 Comments

image: Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

By | January 19, 2015

Vernon Mountcastle, who mapped the functional landscape of the neocortex, passed away at age 96.

0 Comments

image: Crossed Wires

Crossed Wires

By | January 16, 2015

From similar sets of neuroimaging data, researchers are reaching different conclusions about whether brain wiring differs between men and women.

7 Comments

image: Roche Snags Tumor Tester for $1B

Roche Snags Tumor Tester for $1B

By | January 13, 2015

The pharmaceutical company bought a majority stake in Foundation Medicine, a firm that develops personalized cancer-medicine diagnostics.

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image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk.  

7 Comments

image: Eye on the Fly

Eye on the Fly

By | January 1, 2015

Automating Drosophila behavior screens gives researchers a break from tedious observation, and enables higher-throughput, more-quantitative experiments than ever before.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: Micro Masterpiece

Micro Masterpiece

By | January 1, 2015

The artful science of Tom Deerinck, a micrographer who consistently places in Nikon’s Small World competition

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image: Rat Race

Rat Race

By | January 1, 2015

Neuroscientist Anthony Zador explains why he uses rats to understand auditory attention in the brain.

0 Comments

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