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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2014

Me, Myself, and Why, RedDevil 4, Neanderthal Man, and Science from Sight to Insight

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image: Fly on a String

Fly on a String

By | February 1, 2014

Fruit flies are fixed to a silica fiber in this new technique to aid neuroscientists in performing laser surgery prior to neuroimaging.

3 Comments

image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

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image: Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

By | February 1, 2014

New technology probes the functional unit of nervous transmission.

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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | February 1, 2014

Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.  

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image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

Antioxidants Speed Up Lung Cancer

By | January 29, 2014

Swedish scientists have discovered why two antioxidants accelerate tumor growth in mice, helping to explain the results of disappointing human trials.

3 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

Contagious Dog Cancer Sequenced

By | January 23, 2014

A dog tumor that became a free-living parasite picked up myriad mutations, but has since stabilized.

8 Comments

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