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image: Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

By | January 20, 2017

Researchers find diverse ways that the molecules can regulate cancer’s spread.

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A cell phone–based microscope can identify mutations in tumor tissue and image products of DNA sequencing reactions.

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image: Image of the Day: Feeding Time

Image of the Day: Feeding Time

By | January 10, 2017

Scientists are working to improve the abilities of therapeutic antibodies to flag cancer cells (orange) for destruction by macrophages (blue).  

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The tumor biologist’s landmark discovery provided the first clear evidence that genetic mutations could lead to cancer, and gave rise to a crucial cancer drug.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Newly Found White Blood Cell Withstands Chemotherapy

Newly Found White Blood Cell Withstands Chemotherapy

By | January 1, 2017

Vaccine-induced macrophages open a new realm of study into remodeling the immune system to reduce the risk of infections during cancer treatment.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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