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image: Review: <em>The Origin of Species</em>

Review: The Origin of Species

By | November 22, 2013

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute this week released three short films to teach students about evolution and speciation.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

2 Comments

image: It Takes Two

It Takes Two

By | November 21, 2013

Two genes from the Y chromosome are sufficient to generate male mice capable of fathering healthy offspring via an assisted reproductive technique.

1 Comment

image: Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

By | November 21, 2013

Chytrid fungus has likely driven the decline of two South American frog species named for Charles Darwin.

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image: Temperature-Dependent Immunity

Temperature-Dependent Immunity

By | November 18, 2013

Scientists show that mice housed at room temperature are less able to fight tumors.

8 Comments

image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.

20 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 11–15

Week in Review: November 11–15

By | November 15, 2013

Combating bacterial persistence; ancient canine evolution; T cells and transplants; sharing omics data and code

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image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.

7 Comments

image: Felid Fossils

Felid Fossils

By | November 13, 2013

Paleontologists discover the oldest evidence yet suggesting that big cats originated in Asia.

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