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Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Why Women Lose Fertility

Why Women Lose Fertility

By | September 1, 2013

Mating behavior is an unlikely driver of women's reproductive aging.

5 Comments

image: Ovarian Cancer Screen Shows Promise

Ovarian Cancer Screen Shows Promise

By | August 27, 2013

A blood test for the protein CA-125, coupled with a vaginal ultrasound, can help detect the difficult-to-spot cancer.

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image: Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

By | August 27, 2013

The transmission of reticuloendotheliosis viruses from mammals to birds was most likely an unexpected consequence of medical research.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Week in Review: August 12–16

Week in Review: August 12–16

By | August 16, 2013

Engineered immune cells attack tumors; a mouth microbe that can cause cancer; HIV may heighten cocaine’s high; craving high-fat foods

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image: Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

By | August 16, 2013

The chipmunk-sized Rugosodon eurasiaticus is the oldest representative of a prolific and long-lasting mammalian lineage.

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image: Mutation Patterns Underlie Cancers

Mutation Patterns Underlie Cancers

By | August 15, 2013

More than 20 genome-wide mutational “signatures” account for the vast majority of 30 common cancers.

2 Comments

image: Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

By | August 14, 2013

Two studies peg down how a bacterium indigenous to the oral cavity can contribute to the development of colorectal cancer.

1 Comment

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

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