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image: Gene Mutations Foretell Immunotherapy Response

Gene Mutations Foretell Immunotherapy Response

By | June 12, 2017

A drug that blocks an immune checkpoint protein effectively treats tumors in patients with deficient DNA repair genes. 

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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

By | May 1, 2017

A new approach to immunotherapy finds that the immune-cell clonotypes that come to the rescue start out at very low frequencies.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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By implanting patient- or rodent-derived mini-guts into mice, scientists can rapidly create more-accurate murine models of the disease

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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