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image: Epigenetic Cancer Therapy Clears Phase I

Epigenetic Cancer Therapy Clears Phase I

By | April 7, 2014

Investigational drug that inhibits proteins involved with epigenetic regulation shows activity against certain blood cancers in an early-stage clinical trial.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

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image: Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

Capturing Cancer Cells on the Move

By | April 1, 2014

Three approaches for isolating and characterizing rare tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

Fighting Cancer with Nanomedicine

By | April 1, 2014

Nanotechnology-based therapeutics will revolutionize cancer treatment.

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image: Going Long

Going Long

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers discover a tool to trigger an uncommon strategy cancer cells can use to lengthen their telomeres.

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image: Search and Destroy

Search and Destroy

By | April 1, 2014

Turning a patient’s immune cells into cancer-fighting weapons

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image: Stem Cell Alter Egos

Stem Cell Alter Egos

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers show that cancer stem cells can exist in two distinct and interconvertible states.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

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