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image: Screening  with CRISPR

Screening with CRISPR

By | June 1, 2016

Ever-improving CRISPR-based tools are already ripe for large-scale genetic screens.

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Member, Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Age: 43

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Exposing male rats to nonionizing radiation increased the animals’ risk of brain and heart tumors in a study, but the findings are far from conclusive.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

By | May 23, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights Roche’s Tecentriq, which blocks a protein that obstructs the immune system’s ability to fight cancer.

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The Oracle cofounder’s gift will fund a new institute at the University of Southern California.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By , and | April 20, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting

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