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Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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Models of Transparency

By , , and | April 1, 2013

Researchers are taking advantage of small, transparent zebrafish embryos and larvae—and a special strain of see-through adults—to understand the development and spread of cancer.

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Cancer Gene Bonanza

By | March 27, 2013

International collaboration doubles the number of genetic regions associated with breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers.

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Breath Test for Stomach Cancer

By | March 8, 2013

Researchers develop a test that can tell the difference between stomach cancer and other gastrointestinal complaints.

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Cancer Research Advocate Dies

By | March 5, 2013

A champion of breast cancer awareness in the African-American community passes away at 63.

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All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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Little Cancer Risk from Fukushima

By | March 1, 2013

A new report from the World Health Organization predicts only very minimal increases in cancer risk for residents in the vicinity of the nuclear disaster.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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