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image: FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

FDA Approves Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy

By | May 23, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights Roche’s Tecentriq, which blocks a protein that obstructs the immune system’s ability to fight cancer.

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The Oracle cofounder’s gift will fund a new institute at the University of Southern California.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

Tasmanian Devil Antibodies Fight Cancer

By | May 9, 2016

The proteins could be the key to stopping the transmissible facial tumor disease that is threatening the species.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By , , and | April 20, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting

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image: Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

By | April 20, 2016

Contamination concerns at cell therapy and radioactive tracer facilities spur production shutdowns.

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image: AACR Q&A: Angelika Amon

AACR Q&A: Angelika Amon

By | April 19, 2016

The aneuploidy expert shares what she has learned at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Running from Cancer?

Running from Cancer?

By | April 18, 2016

At the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting, researchers review the evidence that exercise has antitumor benefits.

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image: Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature

Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature

By | April 18, 2016

Clusters of tumor-derived cells can pass through narrow channels that mimic human capillaries, scientists show in vitro and in zebrafish.

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