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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Cancer's Vanguard

Cancer's Vanguard

By | April 1, 2016

Exosomes are emerging as key players in metastasis.

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image: Cancerous Conduits

Cancerous Conduits

By | April 1, 2016

Metastatic cancer cells use nanotubes to manipulate blood vessels.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Death in the Dust

Death in the Dust

By | April 1, 2016

Follow Michele Carbone as he tracks down the genetic and environmental drivers of mesothelioma and other cancers.

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image: Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

Fighting Cancer with Infection, 1891

By | April 1, 2016

Now hailed as the father of immunotherapy, William Coley pioneered extraordinary methods to treat cancer.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: Pet Scans

Pet Scans

By , , and | April 1, 2016

Studying tumor development and treatment in dogs and cats, in parallel with research on rodents and humans, could improve the successful translation of new cancer drugs.

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Instructor, Department of Systems Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Age: 38

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image: Pulling It All Together

Pulling It All Together

By | April 1, 2016

Systems-biology approaches offer new strategies for finding hard-to-identify drug targets for cancer.

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