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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

0 Comments

image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

0 Comments

image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Ovarian Cancer Screen Shows Promise

Ovarian Cancer Screen Shows Promise

By | August 27, 2013

A blood test for the protein CA-125, coupled with a vaginal ultrasound, can help detect the difficult-to-spot cancer.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: August 12–16

Week in Review: August 12–16

By | August 16, 2013

Engineered immune cells attack tumors; a mouth microbe that can cause cancer; HIV may heighten cocaine’s high; craving high-fat foods

0 Comments

image: Mutation Patterns Underlie Cancers

Mutation Patterns Underlie Cancers

By | August 15, 2013

More than 20 genome-wide mutational “signatures” account for the vast majority of 30 common cancers.

2 Comments

image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

image: Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

Mouth Microbe Turns Carcinogenic

By | August 14, 2013

Two studies peg down how a bacterium indigenous to the oral cavity can contribute to the development of colorectal cancer.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: August 5–9

Week in Review: August 5–9

By | August 9, 2013

Flu researchers propose H7N9 studies; NIH makes deal to share HeLa genome; herbal “remedies” can cause cancer; scientists record grid cell activity in humans

0 Comments

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