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image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

InĀ 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

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Avant-Garde Science

By | June 1, 2012

Why naked mole-rats and experimental gene therapies remind me of groundbreaking artists.

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image: Delivering New Genes

Delivering New Genes

By | June 1, 2012

Gene therapies typically involve the introduction of genetic material into target cells to replace or supplement an existing, usually dysfunctional, gene. 

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image: Digging the Underground Life

Digging the Underground Life

By | June 1, 2012

A rare peek inside the subterranean home of the naked mole-rat

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image: Messing with HIV

Messing with HIV

By | June 1, 2012

Sangamo Biosciences is putting a different spin on gene therapy. 

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image: From Bones to Brains

From Bones to Brains

By | June 1, 2012

With the help of a mother, one researcher uncovered a common link between autism and a devastating bone disease.

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image: Regulations for Biosimilars

Regulations for Biosimilars

By | June 1, 2012

As biologic drug patents begin to expire, generic versions will hit the market—but how will they be regulated?

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image: Targeting DNA

Targeting DNA

By | June 1, 2012

After 20 years of high-profile failure, gene therapy is finally well on its way to clinical approval.

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The Blood Exchange, Circa 1930

By | June 1, 2012

Early 20th century cross circulation experiments on dogs paved the way for milestones in human cardiac surgery.

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image: Underground Supermodels

Underground Supermodels

By | June 1, 2012

What can a twentysomething naked mole-rat tell us about fighting pain, cancer, and aging?

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