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image: Q&A: The Cancer Tradeoff

Q&A: The Cancer Tradeoff

By | April 3, 2013

Physicist-turned-oncologist Robert Austin argues that cancer is a natural consequence of our rapid evolution.

26 Comments

image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

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image: Making Cancer More Transparent

Making Cancer More Transparent

By | April 1, 2013

A decade into the age of genomics, science is generating a flood of data that will help in the quest to eradicate the disease.

3 Comments

image: Mighty Modifications

Mighty Modifications

By | April 1, 2013

Histone acetylation levels keep intracellular pH in check.

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image: Up, Up, and Array

Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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image: Models of Transparency

Models of Transparency

By , , , and | April 1, 2013

Researchers are taking advantage of small, transparent zebrafish embryos and larvae—and a special strain of see-through adults—to understand the development and spread of cancer.

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image: Cancer Gene Bonanza

Cancer Gene Bonanza

By | March 27, 2013

International collaboration doubles the number of genetic regions associated with breast, prostate, and ovarian cancers.

2 Comments

image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

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