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image: Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

Stem Cell Divisions Help Explain Cancer Risk

By | January 1, 2015

An analysis of 31 tissues finds that random mutations acquired during stem cell divisions correlate with lifetime cancer risk.  

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: “Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

“Father of Modern Hematology” Dies

By | December 17, 2014

Australian researcher Donald Metcalf, whose discoveries transformed cancer treatment, has passed away at age 85.

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image: Vanishing Y Chromosomes

Vanishing Y Chromosomes

By | December 4, 2014

A new study reveals an association between smoking and rates of Y chromosome loss in blood cells, which may explain elevated cancer risk among male smokers.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

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image: Cadherin Connection

Cadherin Connection

By | December 1, 2014

A multitasking plasma membrane protein coordinates cell division and energy metabolism in healthy—and perhaps also cancerous—Drosophila cells.

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image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

image: Illuminating the Interactome

Illuminating the Interactome

By | November 20, 2014

A massive screen yields the most comprehensive map of binary human protein interactions to date.

10 Comments

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