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image: HHS Updates Carcinogens List

HHS Updates Carcinogens List

By | October 3, 2014

Four chemicals are added to the official US catalog of potential cancer-causing substances.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Recruiting Anthrax to Oncology

Recruiting Anthrax to Oncology

By | September 26, 2014

In the latest development in trying to use Bacillus anthracis to kill cancer, researchers send “antibody mimics” inside tumor cells.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Small Wonders

Small Wonders

By | September 11, 2014

Sangeeta Bhatia, creator of miniature medical technologies, has won the Lemelson-MIT Prize.

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image: Watson to Match Patients to Clinical Trials

Watson to Match Patients to Clinical Trials

By | September 8, 2014

IBM’s cognitive computer will be individualizing trial plans for cancer patients at the Mayo Clinic.

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image: FDA Gives Nod to Melanoma Drug

FDA Gives Nod to Melanoma Drug

By | September 8, 2014

The US Food and Drug Administration last week approved the first of a new type of immunotherapy that aims to pit a patient’s own immune system against her cancer.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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