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image: Cancer Kismet

Cancer Kismet

By | April 1, 2015

Fate mapping allows researchers to follow cancer progression from its cell type of origin.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Control ALT, Delete Cancer

Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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image: Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

Leukemia Under the Lens, 1845

By | April 1, 2015

Alfred Donné’s microscopic daguerreotypes described the cellular symptoms of leukemia for the first time.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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image: Mining the Outliers

Mining the Outliers

By | April 1, 2015

Even when a clinical trial fails, some patients improve. What can researchers learn from these exceptional responders?

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Professional Marksman

By | April 1, 2015

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.

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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: Signaling Resistance

Signaling Resistance

By | April 1, 2015

Activating signaling pathways, rather than individual genes, reveals roles for both growth and dedifferentiation in establishing resistance to cancer treatments.

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