The Scientist

» cancer and ecology

Most Recent

image: Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

Neonicotinoids May Harm Wild Bees

By | August 16, 2016

Exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides is correlated with population declines of a large number of wild bee species, according to a field study conducted in the U.K.

1 Comment

image: Seven More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

Seven More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

By | August 10, 2016

All of the papers had been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

1 Comment

image: The Badger-Cow TB Connection

The Badger-Cow TB Connection

By | August 5, 2016

Researchers in the U.K. report that badgers may be passing tuberculosis to farm animals not through direct contact, as was previously suspected, but through exposure to urine and feces.

1 Comment

Researchers reveal how seals affect vegetation patterns and influence the movement of feral horse populations on Sable Island in Canada.

0 Comments

image: Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

By | July 28, 2016

Genomic analysis reveals wolves and coyotes have hybridized, potentially complicating wolves' protection under the US Endangered Species Act.

0 Comments

image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

0 Comments

image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

2 Comments

image: CRISPR Therapy to Enter Trials

CRISPR Therapy to Enter Trials

By | July 25, 2016

Researchers in China will use the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit T cells extracted from patients with cancer before those cells are returned to the body to target malignant ones.

0 Comments

image: Arming Synthetic Bacteria Against Cancer

Arming Synthetic Bacteria Against Cancer

By | July 20, 2016

Researchers engineer bacteria that deliver an anti-tumor toxin in mice before self-destructing. 

0 Comments

image: Distinguishing Circulating Tumor from Normal Cell-Free DNA

Distinguishing Circulating Tumor from Normal Cell-Free DNA

By | July 19, 2016

Fragments of circulating DNA from tumors are around 20 to 30 base pairs shorter than those from healthy cells, researchers report.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Evolutionary History of Dogs
  4. Record-Setting Corn Grows 45 Feet Tall
AAAS