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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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image: Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

By | May 1, 2017

A new approach to immunotherapy finds that the immune-cell clonotypes that come to the rescue start out at very low frequencies.

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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By implanting patient- or rodent-derived mini-guts into mice, scientists can rapidly create more-accurate murine models of the disease

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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The state’s board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to “intelligent design” arguments.

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image: Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

By | April 14, 2017

Ben Henry explores the science behind a deep-fried cancer scare and traditional treatments that may shrink tumors.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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