The Scientist

» cancer, evolution and immunology

Most Recent

image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

0 Comments

image: Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

By | January 27, 2017

A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.

0 Comments

image: Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

By | January 20, 2017

Researchers find diverse ways that the molecules can regulate cancer’s spread.

0 Comments

Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

2 Comments

A cell phone–based microscope can identify mutations in tumor tissue and image products of DNA sequencing reactions.

1 Comment

image: Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

Baboons Can Make Sounds Found in Human Speech

By | January 13, 2017

The findings suggest language may have started to evolve millions of years earlier than once thought.  

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Feeding Time

Image of the Day: Feeding Time

By | January 10, 2017

Scientists are working to improve the abilities of therapeutic antibodies to flag cancer cells (orange) for destruction by macrophages (blue).  

0 Comments

The tumor biologist’s landmark discovery provided the first clear evidence that genetic mutations could lead to cancer, and gave rise to a crucial cancer drug.

0 Comments

image: Adaptation, Island Style

Adaptation, Island Style

By | January 3, 2017

Anole lizards inhabiting the Caribbean islands display some of the key principles of evolution.

0 Comments

The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
  4. Human Cord Plasma Protein Boosts Cognitive Function in Older Mice
AAAS