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image: Skin Cells Cause Cancer?

Skin Cells Cause Cancer?

By | January 6, 2012

Certain skin-residing immune cells may—under specific conditions—play a direct role in initiating skin cancer after exposure to environmental toxins.

12 Comments

image: Secrets of Breast Cancer Resistance

Secrets of Breast Cancer Resistance

By | January 4, 2012

A new study shows that breast cancers that become resistant to hormone therapy have different patterns of estrogen receptor binding.

3 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2012

Our Dying Planet, Here Be Dragons, Rat Island, Harnessed

0 Comments

image: High-Tech Choir Master

High-Tech Choir Master

By | January 1, 2012

Elaine Mardis can make DNA sequencers sing, generating genome data that shed light on evolution and disease.

0 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Anthropomorphism: A Peculiar Institution

Anthropomorphism: A Peculiar Institution

By | January 1, 2012

Should we rethink the parallel drawn between “slave-making” ants and human slavery, and other such oversimplifications of animal behavior?

27 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2012

January 2012's selection of notable quotes

3 Comments

image: Magnetic Swimmers Cultured

Magnetic Swimmers Cultured

By | December 22, 2011

For the first time, researchers culture a bacteria that uses a magnetic sulfide compound to navigate.

3 Comments

image: A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

A Cancer-Heart Disease Link

By | December 22, 2011

Mutations known to increase the risk of developing ovarian and breast cancer may also make carriers susceptible to heart failure.

0 Comments

image: The Evolution of Drug Resistance

The Evolution of Drug Resistance

By | December 18, 2011

Researchers use whole-genome sequencing to keep tabs on the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

9 Comments

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