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image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.

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image: Cancer Research ROI

Cancer Research ROI

By | June 16, 2014

Report quantifies the returns from the U.K.’s investments in oncology.

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image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Week in Review: June 9–13

Week in Review: June 9–13

By | June 13, 2014

Ancient apoptotic pathway connects humans to coral; lab-grown, light-sensing retinal tissue; tracking cancer with synthetic phospholipids; diving deep into the lung microbiome

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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

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Scientists generate tumor-targeting molecules that can be used for imaging and treatment.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 11, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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