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image: Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

By | April 29, 2016

Infusing anti-HIV antibodies provides macaques with protection against infection for up to six months, according to a study.

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By , and | April 20, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting

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image: Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

Two NIH Labs Cease Reagent Production

By | April 20, 2016

Contamination concerns at cell therapy and radioactive tracer facilities spur production shutdowns.

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image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

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image: Theranos in Criminal Probe

Theranos in Criminal Probe

By | April 19, 2016

Federal officials are investigating whether the diagnostics company misled investors.

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The massive rock that smashed into Earth 66 million years ago killed off many dinosaur species, but the animals were in steady decline for millennia before the cataclysm, researchers report.

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image: AACR Q&A: Angelika Amon

AACR Q&A: Angelika Amon

By | April 19, 2016

The aneuploidy expert shares what she has learned at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Running from Cancer?

Running from Cancer?

By | April 18, 2016

At the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting, researchers review the evidence that exercise has antitumor benefits.

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image: Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature

Circulating Tumor Cells Traverse Tiny Vasculature

By | April 18, 2016

Clusters of tumor-derived cells can pass through narrow channels that mimic human capillaries, scientists show in vitro and in zebrafish.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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