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image: Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured

By | April 14, 2017

Ben Henry explores the science behind a deep-fried cancer scare and traditional treatments that may shrink tumors.

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image: CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

By | April 12, 2017

Using CRISPR-Cpf1 gene editing, researchers have fixed mutations that cause a form of muscular dystrophy in cultured human cardiomyocytes and a mouse model.

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Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

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23andMe customers can now receive information about genetic risk for diseases including Parkinson’s and celiac.

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image: New Giant Virus Group Reported

New Giant Virus Group Reported

By | April 6, 2017

A genomic analysis of “Klosneuviruses” suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced. 

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Octopus, cuttlefish, and squid extensively edit messenger RNAs in an evolutionarily conserved process. 

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image: Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

Cross-Sample Sequencing Contamination Galore

By | April 5, 2017

Scientists conducting a large-scale, comparative transcriptomics project have inadvertently highlighted widespread contamination in sequencing data.

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image: Speaking of Cancer Research

Speaking of Cancer Research

By | April 5, 2017

Notable quotes from this year’s annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research

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image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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At the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.

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