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A study suggests that “chief” cells in the stomach act as reserve stem cells that are activated by tissue damage and may be the long-sought source of gastric cancer.

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image: Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

By | June 12, 2017

Ned Sharpless currently leads the cancer center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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image: Gene Mutations Foretell Immunotherapy Response

Gene Mutations Foretell Immunotherapy Response

By | June 12, 2017

A drug that blocks an immune checkpoint protein effectively treats tumors in patients with deficient DNA repair genes. 

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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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The publicly available database found nearly a third of samples included mutations targeted by either approved drugs or therapies in clinical trials. 

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: Infographic: A Body Without Food

Infographic: A Body Without Food

By | June 1, 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that intermittent fasting causes significant changes to various organs and tissue types.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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